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Hackaday Podcast 141: LowFER Badges, Outrun Clocks, Dichroic Lamps, and Piano Action

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Hackaday editors Mike and Elliot Williams catch up on a week’s worth of hacks. It turns out there are several strange radio bands that don’t require a license, and we discuss this weekend’s broadcast where you can listen in. It’s unlikely you’ve ever seen the website check-box abused quite like this: it’s the display for playing Doom! Just when you thought you’d seen all the ESP32’s tricks it gets turned into a clock styled after Out Run. Mike geeks out over how pianos work, we’re both excited to have Jeremy Fielding giving a Keynote talk at Remoticon, and we wrap things up with a chat about traffic rules in space.

Take a look at the links below if you want to follow along, and as always, tell us what you think about this episode in the comments!

Direct download (50 MB)

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Episode 141 Show Notes:

What’s that Sound?

Tell us your answer for this week’s “What’s that sound?”. Next week on the show we’ll randomly draw one name from the correct answers to win a rare Hackaday Podcast T-shirt.

News This Week:

Making Your Projects Move: Jeremy Fielding To Deliver Remoticon Keynote
VCF East Roars Back To Life

Interesting Hacks of the Week:

Printed Piano Mechanism Sure Is Grand

How does a piano work? Pulling apart a grand piano – YouTube
How the Grand Piano Works – YouTube
Note by Note: The Making of Steinway L1037 (2007) – IMDb

A Microwave Frequency Doubler

Microwaves101
RF Power Meter – Village Telco Wiki

Hacking An IKEA Lampshade Into A Stunning Dichroic Lamp

Paper Voxel Sphere : 8 Steps (with Pictures) – Instructables

Arduino Nano Floppy Emulator For When Your Disk Is Not Accessible

An Arduino With A Floppy Drive
GitHub – keirf/FlashFloppy: Floppy drive emulator for Gotek hardware

Play DOOM Using Web Browser Checkboxes (Finally)

Checkboxland – Render anything as HTML checkboxes
zoom – CSS: Cascading Style Sheets
Pulse (Checkerbox land example)
AAlib in full ASCII splendor!

ESP32 Clock Pushes Outrun Graphics Over Composite

Software Defined Television On An ESP32
Run Your Favorite 8-bit Games On An ESP32
JWZ’s Dali Clock Ports

Quick Hacks:

Mike’s Picks

Why Wait For Apple? Upgrade Your IPhone With USB-C Today!
DOOM Played By Tweet
Turning Old Masks Into 3D Printer Filament

Elliot’s Picks:

The Calls Are Coming From Inside The House (or Workshop)
Spinning Threads Put The Bite On Filament In This Novel Extruder Design
The PinePhone Pro Is Here. But It’s Still Probably Not The Year Of Open-Source Linux On The Smartphone

Can’t-Miss Articles:

Space Age Road Rage: Right Of Way Above The Karman Line

Starlink satellites responsible for over 50% of close encounters in space
Pinning Tails On Satellites To Help Prevent Space Junk

The Low-Down On Long-Wave: Unlicensed Experimental Radio

SAQ Grimeton UN-Day Transmission on October 24th, 2021 – The Alexander association
Get Set For SAQ On Alexanderson Day With These Active Antennas
SM6LKM – SAQrx VLF Receiver
PA0RDT Mini Whip

Original Post: hackaday.com

Tech News

Ham Radio Gets Brain Transplant

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Old radios didn’t have much in the way of smarts. But as digital synthesis became more common, radios often had as much digital electronics in them as RF circuits. The problem is that digital electronics get better and better every year, so what looked like high-tech one year is quaint the next. [IMSAI Guy] had an Icom IC-245 and decided to replace the digital electronics inside with — among other things — an Arduino.

He spends a good bit of the first part of the video that you can see below explaining what the design needs to do. An Arduino Nano fits and he uses a few additional parts to get shift registers, a 0-1V digital to analog converter, and an interface to an OLED display.

Unless you have this exact radio, you probably won’t be able to directly apply this project. Still, it is great to look over someone’s shoulder while they design something like this, especially when they explain their reasoning as they go.

The PCB, of course, has to be exactly the same size as the board it replaces, including mounting holes and interface connectors. It looks like he got it right the first time which isn’t always easy. Does it work? We don’t know by the end of the first video. You’ll have to watch the next one (also below) where he actually populates the PCB and tests everything out.

Source: hackaday.com

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Researchers Use Nanoparticles to Kill Dangerous Bacteria That Hide Inside Human Cells

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Researchers from the University of Southampton, working with colleagues at the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl), have developed a new technology based on nanoparticles…

The post Researchers Use Nanoparticles To Kill Dangerous Bacteria That Hide Inside Human Cells appeared first on SciTechDaily.

Source: scitechdaily.com

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Tech News

The Unofficial Guide to (Avoiding) Electrocution

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If you’re reading this sentence, there’s a pretty good chance that you interact with electricity more than just as an end-user. You’re a hacker. You aren’t afraid of a few volts, and your projects may involve both DC and AC voltage. Depending on what you’re working on, you might even be dealing with several thousand volts. And it’s you who Big Clive made the video below the break for.

“Familiarity breeds contempt” as the old saying goes, and the more familiar we are with electronics, the more cavalier we may tend to get. If we allow ourselves to get too lax, we may be found working on live circuits, skimping on safety for the sake of convenience, or jokingly saying “safety third!” far too often as we tear into a hazardous situation without scoping it out first.

Who better to bring us down to earth than Big Clive. In this video, he explains how electricity has the potential to impede the beating of our hearts, the action of our lungs, and even break bones. You’ll find a candid discussion about what electric shock does to a person, how to avoid it, and how to help if someone near you suffers electric shock.

Of course, if safety isn’t your thing, then maybe you’re ready to Shake Hands With Danger.

Original Article: hackaday.com

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